Saturday, November 12, 2011

That's A Good Question


Yes. I moved my desk again. Actually, I ditched the little white desk and yoinked this one from my kids' stash of unwanted furniture in my basement. Finders keepers is my philosophy. 

Gee, I learn new things from y'all constantly.

Today's lesson courtesy of Stephanie, who asked what I knew about the prescription anti-inflammatory Mobic.

Other than the very basics, I knew little about the use of this drug, which meant that I had a new opportunity to dive into the internet and see what I could find.

Um. Is that considered going to the "cloud"? And what the heck is the "cloud" in internet terms, anyway? John has tried to explain it to me repeatedly but I guess this cloud is just too far above my head. Har har.

Sorry. I digress.

Here's what I have learned about Mobic, or meloxicam. This information was found on the PubMed Health site which is a service provided by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) at the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM).


Why is this medication prescribed?


Meloxicam is used to relieve pain, tenderness, swelling, and stiffness caused by osteoarthritis (arthritis caused by a breakdown of the lining of the joints) and rheumatoid arthritis (arthritis caused by swelling of the lining of the joints). Meloxicam is also used to relieve the pain, tenderness,swelling, and stiffness caused by juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (a type of arthritis that affects children) in children 2 years of age and older. Meloxicam is in a class of medications called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). It works by stopping the body's production of a substance that causes pain, fever, and inflammation.


How should this medicine be used?


Meloxicam comes as a tablet and suspension (liquid) to take by mouth. It is usually taken once a day with or without food. Take meloxicam at the same time every day. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take meloxicam exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor. Shake the suspension well before each use to mix the medication evenly.


Other uses for this medicine


Meloxicam is also used sometimes to treat ankylosing spondylitis (arthritis that mainly affects the spine). Talk to your doctor about the possible risks of using this medication for your condition.


This medication may be prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.


What special precautions should I follow?


Before taking meloxicam,

  • Tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to meloxicam, aspirin or other NSAIDs such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), or any other medications.
  • Tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention the medications listed in the IMPORTANT WARNING section and any of the following: angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), fosinopril (Monopril), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), and quinapril (Accupril); cholestyramine (Questran); diuretics ('water pills'); lithium (Eskalith, Lithobid, others); and methotrexate (Rheumatrex). Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects.
  • Tell your doctor if you have or have ever had asthma, especially if you have frequent stuffed or runny nose or nasal polyps (swelling of the lining of the nose); swelling of the hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs; or kidney or liver disease.
  • Tell your doctor if you are pregnant, especially if you are in the last few months of your pregnancy, you plan to become pregnant, or you are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking meloxicam, call your doctor.
  • If you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are taking meloxicam.

What should I do if I forget a dose?


Take the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.


What side effects can this medication cause?


Meloxicam may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

  • diarrhea
  • constipation
  • gas
  • sore throat
  • cough
  • runny nose

Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately. Do not take any more meloxicam until you speak to your doctor:

  • fever
  • blisters
  • rash
  • hives
  • itching
  • swelling of the eyes, face, tongue, lips, throat, arms, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs
  • difficulty breathing or swallowing
  • hoarseness
  • pale skin
  • fast heartbeat
  • unexplained weight gain
  • nausea
  • excessive tiredness
  • lack of energy
  • yellowing of the skin or eyes
  • pain in the right upper part of the stomach
  • flu-like symptoms
  • cloudy, discolored, or bloody urine
  • back pain
  • difficult or painful urination

Meloxicam may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems while taking this medication.


If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online [at http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch] or by phone [1-800-332-1088].

I just want to point out that although "excessive tiredness" and "lack of energy" is listed as reasons to discontinue the use of this drug and call your physician, for many of us, these are the most problematic symptoms of Sjogren's syndrome. So if this drug seems to cause fatigue above and beyond what you normally experience, then give your doctor a call.

Since I haven't used this drug before, I can't share my personal experiences with it, but I'll bet that some of my readers have. Post a comment if you are on Mobic or have taken it in the past. Please?

1 comment:

Leslie said...

I had a HORRIBLE experience with Meloxicam--it caused stomach bleeding and severe pain, so I was told by a gastroenterologist to stop taking it IMMEDIATELY. It did help with my arthritis pain in my hands, however! Sigh.

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